Tuesday, October 2, 2012

HOW COME DOCTORS KNOW EVERYTHING?





Have you ever wondered how a doctor seems to have a prescription for everything?

You have a headache- Bam! Take this!

You have a fever- Bam! Take two tablets of this.

Your urine looks funny- Bam! This should clear you up.

Amazing right? So what is the secret to this superhuman ability?

1. COMMON THINGS OCCUR COMMONLY.

You might think your case is unique, but a doctor who has practiced for a short time has probably seen hundreds of such cases; just like driving a car, treating that case has become a part of the doctor, he can treat it while asleep.

2. THE POWER OF DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS.

Several illnesses present the same way, and it could be one of a group of possibilities. Whichever the doctor thinks it is, he may follow that line of management.

3. WELL, YOU NEED TO DO SOME TESTS.

This is a sure get out clause, giving the doctor time to consult his notes; who wouldn't agree to some tests to help get at the root of a problem?

4. HEY FRED, COME AND TAKE A LOOK AT THIS.

The power of a second opinion- Who wouldn't want two doctors taking out time to see one patient.

5. SOMETIMES, TESTS COME WITH ANSWERS.

Tests like Microscopy, culture and sensitivity come with recommended drugs to use, leaving the physician to take all the credit.

6. THE SYMPTOMATIC APPROACH.

Pain = analgesic; Fever = anti-pyretic (anti-fever); Malaria= anti-malarial. (You didn't hear that from me.)

7. WATCH AND SEE.

The conservative approach- Who wouldn't want his doctor to say, "It's probably nothing, it will go in a few days. Well, if it hasn't gone in a few days, the doctor would have at least read about it.

8. AND IF ALL ELSE FAILS...

Well, uhm...Kindly give me a minute, I need to check something.

So, have you ever come across a doctor who didn't know everything?

8 comments:

  1. The last time I saw a doctor, it was for stomach pains. He basically had no idea why it was hurting. In my experience, doctors rarely know everything. In fact, part of being a good doctor is admitting that you don't know it all. But, good doctors do know a lot :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a little of everything or a little of most things is all that is needed:)

      Delete
  2. I agree--the sign of a good doctor is one who admits he/she doesn't know everything but is willing to take the time to research the area if need be. In today's medicine, one cannot know it all. Luckily, thanks to the Internet, it is much easier to find the answer and give the best management!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes indeed Carrie; in today's internet world, even the patients have more facts than the doctors.

      Delete
  3. Ever hear the saying, "If you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras." Common things occur commonly indeed.

    The power of the internet means that lots of clients come to me convinced their dog has ear mites. 99.9% of the time it's a yeast infection! So there is still some value in professional school after all :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thinking of (8), I once had a wonderful GP of many years standing – retired now sadly – who told me that when on house calls he might sometimes wander over to the room window and gaze at the garden, after a few minutes silence he would make general remarks on the wonderful view.

    He confessed that while appearing to admire the patients’ garden he was in fact thinking ‘OMG – I have absolutely no idea what these symptoms suggest at all…’

    Anna :o]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha, a situation every sincere physician has been in.

      Delete

Please Drop a Comment.

DAY 3: Preventing PID

Yesterday we talked about how to diagnose PID, today we will look at prevention. Indeed with PID prevention is much better than cure: ...